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CRITIC RAVES ABOUT QUALITY OF ICE SCREEN

"I have never seen anything like it!", shouted internationally acclaimed movie critic, Francois Fellini, in Antarctica to cover the First Annual Antarctic Film Festival, when he saw the screening of Bad Business " I couldn't believe my eyes when I first saw this motion picture playing on a wall of solid ice. Ice makes the best natural surface on which to project a film I have ever seen, the technology is awesome! Each tiny ice crystal, and there are billions of them, refracts and reflects light in an extraordinary manner. The silver screen never looked this good, I can't imagine a screen made of diamonds looking any better. " A travelling companion, whom Mr. Fellini refused to identify, commented that "After seeing Bad Business, on this ice screen, I didn't really see what the big deal was about the ice screen, but I thought the movie sensational. " [to read about the ice screen technology click here]
Local Population Takes To Cinema Like Ducks To Water
Photograph ©Movie City Entertainment - 1999

Photo available on t-shirt - check out Penguin Shop

A CINEMA FIRST;

A MOVIE ALL DONE P.O.V.

(CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE)

P.O.V. has been used from time to time in many movies, often to show a camera's point of view, but, according to director Mintz, for an entire film. Mintz, who plays the off camera voice of the cameraman, is only seen occassionally, in reflections off an occasional mirror, once when he hands the camera to the hitman, who shoots him (with the camera) and once when a hidden camera being worn inside a baseball hat flies off his head and captures the action while a mob thug works him over. "In essence " says Mintz, " the camera becomes a character in the film."

FESTIVAL PLANS NEW LOCATION
The Festival is in negotiations to build it's new home featuring the world's largest ice screen. The site, high atop Antarctica's largest glacier, will provide panoramic views as well as provide a sheltered environment for the an outdoor ice ampitheater to accommodate 10,000 viewers. Phase one of the land acquisition is in the final stages and the Festival Committee is poised to approve the deal, pending a favorable environmental study, which is anticipated. According to C. T. Pinguino, Festival Director, the festival expects easy approval since the entire facility will be constructed of ice.


Penguins dive into cool waters near the site where the ice screen blocks are mined.

THE TECHNOLOGY BEHIND THE ICE SCREEN ®
The theater sized screen made of solid ice was the concept of ICE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. which has spent years developing the concept. The technology is the first of its kind in the world to utilize ice block construction in multi-story structures incorporates ideas from traditional Eskimo igloos, the latest in laser cutting ice technologies and several ideas inspired by the ancient Egyptian pyramid builders. Massive ice blocks are cut from pristine Antarctic glaciers at the Arctic Circle and transported several miles to the site by floating them in the frigid waters of Ross Sea, propelled by radio controlled aquapallets. Once on shore the blocks are hauled over the icy terrain to the site by dog sled where they are erected in place, like gigantic Leggo blocks, to a height of more than 100 feet. Clark Perry, Chairman of the Board of Ice Technologies , Inc. believes the screens will have enormous potential in markets across the globe. " Ice screens®, are extremely easy to build and cost less per square foot than any other material. Another tremendous advantage of installing them in theaters is that the cool screens provide a natural and low cost alternative to air conditioning which can really drive up the costs of building a movie theater, especially in the 3rd world." (The company would be happy to provide their computer test models to prospective users of the technology ) Mr. Perry also indicated that his company is doing refraction experiments which would allow one Ice Screen® to play four separate films at the same time, however he would not disclose how they were doing it, deflecting the question by saying only that the technology was proprietary.

MICHAEL PRESSMAN, well known Hollywood director,
calls Bad Business an "American Dogme Comedy."

"The Dogme movement is happening. Thomas Vinterberg's CELEBRATION shows us that story is the most important thing. To that end, director Murray Mintz, with his "digital" feature, BAD BUSINESS, has joined the likes of Vinterberg and Lars Von Trier in the Dogme movement, but with a comic twist. Shooting with that little video camera, without lights, or a crew for that matter, he could achieve an enormous amount of reality, and I am not saying that because I play "I Charlie, the hitman's financial advisor" People have to see this movie! Chris Mulkey's performance is genuinely real. Yes, I have read the Dogme Manifesto and yes this film doesn't rely exclusively on source music and I admit it has a tiny bit underscored music, (A distributor was overheard after a screening, complaining that "There's no damn score!"), but what you don't realize when you see this film is that there was actually a small orchestra playing just off screen during every shot. If you take this movie out of the Dogme category for the piddly little bit of scoring, (Created by Ron Sedgwick,which was very good, by the way), then that would be nit-picking. Also, I can forgive a couple of fake gunshots and a few murders too. After all, those Dogme rules, they call them vows of chastity, might be a bit on the stringent side."
Link to Bad Business home page READ THE DOGME MANIFESTO BY CLICKING HERE
If you didn't attend the festival, don't miss the neat festival souvenirs.
Click here to to go to Penguin shop.
You can see a 2.5 minute trailer of Bad Business byclicking here

To order a copy of
Bad Business click here.



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